Home > News > Current Affairs for Women > Millennial women are “ashamed” of earning more than their partners

Millennial women are “ashamed” of earning more than their partners

Wow, 23,648 of you have read this.
millennial couple paying for items

Image provided by Shutterstock

Millennial women feel “ashamed” of earning more than their partners, according to new research.

A study conducted by Refinery29 found that many millennial women felt “ashamed”, “exhausted”, “tired” and even “resentful” that they earned more than their partners.

However, the survey of 130 female breadwinners also found that these women did not mind being the breadwinner as long as they had the choice not to be in the future, their partners contributed equally, or they felt that they could leave a job if they were unhappy.

Amongst the comments of those surveyed, many felt that being the main breadwinner was highly pressurised.

One woman said, “It’s stressful. It’s a huge responsibility. I pressure myself to stay in the job I’m at even if I’m unhappy there.”

Another commented, “It makes me feel a little weary sometimes, like I may never get a break, or get to pursue something I might really love…”

Another woman said, “I do not like feeling solely responsible for all of our financial needs.”

New research conducted by insurer Aegon, found that in the UK 51 per cent of women were the main breadwinner in their households. The survey also found that 46 per cent said it would be their sole responsibility to financially support their family.

Around the world, attitudes are beginning to shift with it becoming more socially acceptable for women to be the main or sole breadwinner. However, the survey found that while women did earn more than their partners, they still had to put in the same amount of hours when it came to household chores.

Figures released last year by the Office of National Statistics showed that daily household chores and childcare are still falling to more women than men.

On average, women carry out 60 per cent more unpaid work than men. This includes cooking, laundry, cleaning, adult care and childcare.

You may also like
Graduates pay-gap
Female graduates earn £6,500 less than male counterparts
millennials featured
Millennial Toolkit: The ABCDs of Rising to the Top as a Millennial
graduate students celebrating their graduation featured
Female students expect to earn 14 per cent less than men
pile of pound coins, money, earn featured
Women earn £300,000 less than men over their careers

Comment on this